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ADDRESS

P.O. Box 1220
Port Townsend,
WA 98368
jeffbocc@co.jefferson.wa.us


PHONE

Phone: 360.385.9100
Fax: 360.385.9382


HOURS

Monday - Friday
8:30 to 4:30

Weekends
Closed

 


 


WHAT IS IT? 

The  Jefferson County Conservation Futures Ordinance creates the Conservation Futures Fund to preserve a system of public open space lands in the county. These open spaces support the health and quality of life of county residents, and maintain Jefferson County as a desirable place to live, visit and locate businesses. The Ordinance sets program goals, the process for allocating funds, and preservation criteria.

Meetings & Hearings

Conservation Futures Map

2017 PROJECT APPLICATIONS

2017 APPLICATION MATERIALS
Applicants are requested to contact staff as soon as possible in the application process.

2016 PROJECT APPLICATIONS

2016 APPLICATION MATERIALS
Applicants are requested to contact staff as soon as possible in the application process.

2016 Conservation Futures Program Manual

2016 Application and Ratings Sheet

CURRENT COMMITTEE MEMBERS

Sarah Spaeth

Jefferson Land Trust

Mary Biskup

Citizen - District 1

David Wilkinson

Citizen - District 1

Jerry Gorsline

Citizen - District 2

Phil Andrus

Citizen - District 2

Lige Christian

Citizen - District 3

JD Gallant

Citizen - District 3

Richard Jahnke

Coastal Areas

Lorna Smith

Ecotourism

Ray Hunter

Fallow Farms

Scott Brinton

Agriculture

Craig Schrader

Climate Change

Rob Harbour

Working Lands



WHAT'S BEEN FUNDED?
 
In 2003, the Board of County Commissioners (BoCC) approved two projects for conservation futures (CF) funding. The Chimacum Creek Estuary project acquired 16 acres of riparian upland on the north bank of the mouth of Chimacum Creek. Conservation Futures funds were matched five to one by Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife funds. The Sunfield Farm project will purchase a conservation easement to protect 71 acres of agricultural, wetlands, and woodlands just off Rhody Drive in the midst of the Tri-Area urban growth area.

In 2004, nine acres were approved for addition to the Quimper Wildlife Corridor – a conservation project initiated by the Jefferson Land Trust in 1997. The Corridor consists of a series of key forested and wetland parcel between the Middlepoint Land Conservancy easement and Fort Worden State Park that provide important wildlife habitat as well as storm water storage, filtration and treatment. Also approved in 2004 was partial funding for 3.23 acres near the entrance to Port Townsend along Highway 20, known as the Gateway Project, through the cooperative efforts of Jefferson County, the City of Port Townsend, the Port Townsned Chamber of Commerce, the Economic Development Council, Jefferson Land Trust, Kevin Widell, owner of A-Plus Equipment Rental, and many local businessmen and private citizens.

In 2005, the use of CF funds was approved towards the purchase of a 20-acre easement near Andersen Lake State Park and Tamanowas Rock on property owned by the Jamestown S'Klallam Tribe. The conservation of the 20-acre parcel is Phase I of a multi-phase project to create a sanctuary for Tamanowas Rock. The project area and nearby forest is habitat for over 200 species of birds, including eagles, and a branch of the Sequim elk herd frequents the area.

Also in 2005, CF funds were approved for the purchase of a conservation easement on 47 acres on lower Tarboo Creek on Coyle Road. The area includes critical areas such as steep slopes, streams, and wetlands and is part of a long-term program to restore the Tarboo watershed. The proposed site adjoins an existing 160-acre critical habitat preserve along lower Tarboo Creek owned by WDFW and is less than one mile from the 220-acre Tarboo Wildlife Preserve. Jefferson Land Trust will be responsible for stewardship and monitoring of the easements. The Northwest Watershed Institute was the project applicant and will conduct long-term restoration of the properties.

In 2006, up to $86,950 was approved for the fee-simple purchase of the Winona Buffer project, ten lots between Cook Avenue and Winona Wetland in Port Townsend. The purpose of the project is to provide permanent protection for approximately 1.5 acres of scrub/shrub and woodlands for wildlife habitat and human enjoyment. The Winona Wetland is one of four important wetlands within Jefferson Land Trust’s Quimper Wildlife Corridor. The corridor area is recognized in Jefferson County’s Comprehensive Plan map as Parks, Recreation Areas, Conservation Easements and Areas for Future Cooperative Preservation Efforts. It is also recognized in the City of Port Townsend Comprehensive Plan and in the Parks and Open Space Plan. The Winona Buffer was identified as Tier 1 for acquisition in the Quimper Wildlife Corridor Management Plan of March 2005 because the habitat quality is some of the best to be found within the corridor. The Buffer’s relatively moist soils support a forest canopy of conifers, red alder, Scouler’s willow, and bitter cherry. salmonberry and red elderberry are common shrubs. The corridor is habitat for over 120 species of birds including amphibians and mammals. It also provides stormwater treatment and is used by residents and visitors for walking, bicycling, horseback riding and educational field trips.

In 2007, the BoCC approved the use of $230,000 towards the Glendale Farm project. Jefferson Land Trust is the sponsor of this project to retain a historic 180-acre farm in agricultural production and preserve pastoral vistas between Beaver Valley and Center Roads just south of Chimacum, WA. A conservation easement will reduce the development potential of the property from 12 additional home sites to one and restrict a parcel to businesses related to agriculture. Removal of prime soils, forested stream buffer width, and manipulation of water courses would also be restricted. About 160 acres are in open pasture with an additional 20 acres of forest. Chimacum Creek runs through the center of the farm for 2700 feet.

Also in 2007, the Upper Tarboo Creek Conservation project was granted up to $150,000 towards a conservation easement to restore forest habitat on a 50-acre parcel near the intersection of Hwy 104 and Center Road. Approximately 1600 feet of Tarboo Creek flows through the property. This section of stream contains spawning and rearing habitat for coho salmon and other fish species.

In 2008, two projects were awarded funding. The BoCC approved the use of up to $207,500 towards the purchase of a conservation easement for Finnriver Farm’s 33 acres. This sum includes $4,000 in operation and maintenance costs. The match includes grants from the Washington State Farmland Protection program, the Federal Farm and Ranchland Protection program and private donations. Chimacum Creek runs through the center of the property. “The increasing growth in neighboring counties and loss of regional farmlands, gives Jefferson County a unique opportunity to set a model for healthy rural businesses while preserving vital bottom lands for agriculture, clean water and scenic vistas that bring important tourist dollars to our area,” said CF Committee Chair Chris Llewellyn in a letter to the BoCC. “By conserving Finnriver Farm we can take a step to prevent our area from succumbing to the fate of other vital fertile farming areas in our state,” she added. Also in 2008, the Tarboo Creek Conservation project was awarded $7,500 towards the fee-simple purchase of 24 acres off of Dabob Road. The match is a grant from the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service National Coastal Wetlands Conservation program. The Northwest Watershed Institute is sponsoring this project as part of a comprehensive, long term effort to protect and restore fish, wildlife and water quality in the Tarboo watershed. The project property is one of the few bottomland areas that still support historic Sitka spruce-cedar forest and spring-fed wetlands. An important tributary of Tarboo Creek is also present.

In 2009, the Quimper Wildlife Corridor, Tarboo Wildlife Preserve East Side Addition and Brown Dairy were awarded funding. The “2009” Quimper Wildlife Corridor Project received $137,500 towards the City of Port Townsend’s purchase of approximately five acres of habitat in an area of particular importance to birdlife and area residents. The commissioners also granted $82,500 towards the purchase of a conservation easement on the 50-acre Brown Dairy, a historic farm near the Chimacum intersection. Both sums include $5,000 for operations and maintenance of the acquisitions over the next ten years. The Tarboo Wildlife Preserve East Side Addition was also granted $50,000 for the fee-simple acquisition of ten acres contiguous with existing protected areas in the Tarboo Valley.

In 2010, the Salmon Creek Riparian Acquisition project, sponsored by Jefferson Land Trust, was awarded $63,394 towards the permanent protection of 160 acres of vacant land off of West Uncas Road near the head of Discovery Bay. Ultimately, the landowner chose not to sell any property interests. The project was discontinued and unspent project funds were made available to new projects. Also in 2010, the Tamanowas Rock and Nicholson Short Plat project received $200,000 over two years towards the permanent protection of 129 acres of vacant land near Anderson Lake State Park. The property is unique geologically and contains Tamanowas Rock, a site of spiritual significance, as well as valuable habitat for wildlife including elk and eagles.

In 2011, the BoCC approved funding for the Carleson Chimacum Creek Acquisition and the Winona Basin – Bloedel projects. The Carleson Chimacum Creek project was awarded up to $25,800 towards the fee simple acquisition of five acres of vacant land on Creek View Lane off of Prospect Avenue and $750 towards operation and maintenance costs. Matching funds were provided by the Salmon Recovery Funding Board through the Washington Recreation and Conservation Office and the Jefferson Land Trust. The project helps complete a fish and wildlife corridor for lower Chimacum Creek including habitat for listed summer chum salmon. The Winona Basin – Bloedel project was also awarded up to $42,100 towards the fee simple acquisition of seven lots (approximately one acre) of vacant land and $600 towards operation and maintenance costs. The match consists of donated land value from a nearby property acquired by the City of Port Townsend in 2009 and cash from the Jefferson Land Trust. This project creates a buffer for an important wetland habitat area of the Quimper Wildlife Corridor.

In 2012, three projects were approved for funding by the BoCC. The Boulton Farm project will receive up to $69,000 towards the purchase of a conservation easement on eight parcels to permanently consolidate 146 acres of prime agricultural soils under single ownership. The farm is located at Highway 101 and Boulton Road. The match of more than 10 to one includes a landowner donation and state grant funds. The L. Brown Trust II project will utilize up to $24,900 towards the fee simple purchase of 15.5 acres spanning Snow Creek near the intersection of Highway 101 and West Uncas Road and $2,000 towards operations and maintenance of the property’s conservation values.  The Tarboo Forest Conservation project was granted up to $167,000 towards the purchase of a conservation easement to prevent development and maintain standing timber volume at 2010 levels on three parcels containing 120 acres of high quality second growth within the Tarboo watershed.

In 2013, four projects were approved for funding by the BoCC. The Duckabush Floodplain project will receive up to $5,000 towards the protection of two properties consisting of 37.1 acres of floodplain and associated uplands off of Duckabush Road near Brinnon to support salmon recovery. The project includes the purchase of conservation easement on 15.2 acres and the fee-simple acquisition of the remaining 21.9 contiguous acres. The proposed match is a $345,275 grant from the Salmon Recovery Funding Board.  The Short Family Farm project was awarded up to $43,500 towards the purchase of a conservation easement on 256 acres of prime pastureland and riparian habitat associated with Chimacum Creek on Center Road near Chimacum. The proposed match is a $486,500 grant from the Washington Wildlife and Recreation Program and a $425,000 grant from the Farm and Ranch Lands Protection Program. This year, the Tarboo Forest Conservation – Phase II project was granted $167,000 towards the purchase of a conservation easement on 118 acres of timberlands between Center and Dabob Roads. The proposed match is a conservation easement on 158 acres of associated timberlands valued at $130,000, a portion of the value of the subject easement valued at $53,000 and $28,035 in related costs. The fourth project, Winona Basin – Bloedel II, was granted up to $80,000 towards the fee-simple acquisition of 22 lots consisting of wildlife habitat within the Fowler’s Park Addition section of the Quimper Wildlife Corridor in the City of Port Townsend. The proposed match is 14 lots of associated open space valued at $120,000 and $95,000 in community funding.

In 2014, the Quimper Wildlife Corridor received $31,176 to protect three parcels (1.4 acres) in the 3.5 mile-long Corridor. One of the parcels consists of four forested lots that intersect with the 100-year floodplain on the City of Port Townsend’s critical areas maps. The second parcel contains mature forest and a trail corridor popular with area residents. The third parcel increases the size of an existing buffer for the Quaking Aspen Wetland. All the properties will be maintained as native forest habitat. A second project, the Snow Creek Watershed Acquisitions project was awarded up to $10,824 towards the protection of two properties in the Snow Creek watershed to benefit native forests and salmon, including ESA-listed summer chum. One would be acquired fee-simple and the other would be the subject of a conservation easement. The subject properties total 104 acres and complement existing protected areas linked to the Discovery Bay estuary.

In 2015, the Commissioners approved funding for four projects:
The 2015 QWC Addition project received $14,626 towards the fee simple acquisition, and operation and maintenance, of five platted parcels within the Quimper Wildlife Corridor totaling 1.11 acres of vacant land near Winona Wetland. The parcels were identified as high conservation priority in the QWC Management Plan which was adopted by the City of Port Townsend in 2008. The match is three parcels owned by Jefferson Land Trust located adjacent to previously conserved properties. Jefferson Land Trust is the project sponsor. The Bishop Dairy Preservation project received $56,225 towards the acquisition of a conservation easement on 264 acres that comprise a historic farm and dairy. The intent of the project is to maintain single ownership of the property while preserving prime soils for agriculture, habitat for fish and wildlife, and scenic qualities along Beaver Valley and Egg and I Roads. Washington Wildlife and Recreation Program and a federal grant program will provide the match. Jefferson Land Trust is the project sponsor. The Lower Big Quilcene River Riparian Protection project received $31,440 towards the fee simple purchase of one parcel of vacant land totaling 14.16 acres along the lower Big Quilcene River to benefit Hood Canal summer chum and other fish and wildlife species. The RCO Salmon Recovery Funding Board will project the match. Operations and maintenance request is $5,925 of the total amount for annual monitoring, weed removal, replanting and stewardship. Jefferson Land Trust is the project sponsor. The Midori Farm project received $94,626 towards the acquisition of a conservation easement on 29 acres of prime soils for agriculture with pockets of mature forest. The proposed match is donation by the landowner and a cash contribution from the Jefferson Land Trust. Operations and maintenance request is $1,820 of the total amount for annual monitoring of the conservation easement provisions and noxious weed removal. Jefferson Land Trust is the project sponsor.

In 2016, four projects were awarded funding. In Port Townsend, the 2016 QWC Addition project plans to enlarge “Cappy’s Woods” by 2.5 acres. The project was awarded $34,814 towards fee simple acquisition, and operation and maintenance, of ten platted parcels within the Quimper Wildlife Corridor. The parcels were identified as high conservation priority in the QWC Management Plan which was adopted by the City of Port Townsend in 2008 and will be acquired by the City. The proposed match is the combined value of four donated parcels with an estimated total value of $17,914 as well as the donation of partial values of three of the subject properties totaling $20,050.  The operations and maintenance request is $4,000 of the total amount for annual monitoring and stewardship. Jefferson Land Trust is the project sponsor. The Big Quilcene River – Moon Valley Reach received $5,000 to help initiate acquisition of property or a conservation easement on up to 107 acres of floodplain and adjacent slopes of the Big Quilcene River above Quilcene. The proposed match is $5,000 from a state grant. The Jefferson County Environmental Health is the project sponsor. Hood Canal Salmon Enhancement Group is the project applicant. The Irondale Beach County Park Additions project will use $22,000 to acquire two parcels of vacant land totaling 1.5 acres on the slope above the existing county park. The proposed match is a donated parcel located adjacent to the subject parcel valued at $22,000. Jefferson County Public Works is the project sponsor. In South County, the Tarboo Creek, Farm, and Forest project will receive up to $97,100 towards the acquisition of a conservation easement on 33 acres of forest and farmland in the Tarboo Valley. The proposed match is the partial value of the easement to be acquired ($60,000) as well as grant(s) and private contributions ($67,000) for operation and maintenance actions to restore conservation values. Jefferson Land Trust is the project sponsor. Northwest Watershed Institute is the project applicant.

 

For information and to request the application packet, contact:
 Tami Pokorny
 Jefferson County Water Quality Division
 Phone: 379-4498.

 

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